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Lecture Series


Mindfulness and Compassion Lecture Series - new format!

Offered through collaboration by
the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy,
Center for Mindfulness and Compassion of
Cambridge Health Alliance, and
David S. Rosenthal Center for Wellness and Health Promotion, Harvard University Health Services

First Monday Evenings, *6:30 PM - 8:30 PM*

September 2017 through June 2018
alternating locations between:
CMC: CHA Center for Mindfulness and Compassion, 26 Central St, 2nd floor, Somerville, MA 02143
(www.chacmc.org for detailed directions)
and
Harvard: Bock Room, 6th floor, Smith Campus Center, Harvard University, 75 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138

Pre-registration encouraged!

Online live-streaming through Facebook available (no account necessary)

2 Continuing Education credits each lecture. Click here or scroll down for detailed information.

Looking for something from last season? Click here for 2016-17 lecture information

Program Description

IMP’s Lecture Series is returning for its 13th year, now in a new format and with co-sponsoring by Cambridge Health Alliance Center for Mindfulness and Compassion and the Center for Wellness, Harvard University!

This monthly continuing education (CE) program is for psychotherapists, health professionals, and other members of the community interested in clinical applications of meditation or mindfulness. Each lecture will address theoretical and clinical issues at the interface of these rich healing traditions, with topics ranging from self-care to trauma to work in schools.

These community evenings offer an opportunity to gather with colleagues in an informal setting to explore the intersection between mindfulness, compassion, and clinical practice. The presenters are notable leaders and speakers in the field who bring with them a wide variety of research and clinical experience.

Each presentation will be followed by Q&A and discussion, moderated by Christopher Willard, PsyD, or Meghan Searl, PhD.

2 CE’s are offered each evening to psychologists, licensed mental health counselors, social workers, marriage and family therapists, and nurses. Please see details at the end of this notice.

Fees: Suggested donation for general attendance is $15.
Continuing Education credits are available for a fee of $30.
Please purchase your tickets with this distinction in mind.

These lectures are suitable for all levels of healthcare professionals and any level of meditation experience. Everyone is invited to attend.

Please register in advance by clicking on the Registration link located at the top and end of each lecture description. Sorry, no refunds for missed sessions.

Videos of the sessions will be posted on our Facebook page and here after each event.

 

Upcoming Lecture

November 6, 2017
Equanimity: An Essential Practice for Turbulent Times     REGISTER HERE
Susan M Pollak MTS, Ed.D.
Location: CMC see address above

Equanimity is a skill that is taught in meditation centers and is a key component in Eastern psychology and philosophy. However, it is virtually absent from the literature in western psychology. As mindfulness and compassion enter the mainstream, this is changing. Equanimity allows us to keep our balance and sanity in difficult times and enables us to be with whatever is happening. This talk will feature experiential practice as well as theory and recent research. Ways to integrate it in clinical work will also be addressed.

At the end of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. explain the key components of equanimity
  2. discuss why it has been a key practice in Eastern philosophy
  3. understand how to bring it into our lives and practice

Susan M Pollak is the president of IMP. She is also a co-founder of the Center for Mindfulness and Compassion, Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School, where she has taught for over 20 years. She is the author of numerous books, most recently Sitting Together: Essential Skills for Mindfulness-Based Psychotherapy, with Thomas Pedulla and Ronald Siegel. She teaches nationally and internationally on the integration of mindfulness and compassion in psychotherapy. Dr. Pollak has a private practice in Cambridge.

Register here for Equanimity: An Essential Practice for Turbulent Times

 

 

2017-18 Schedule

Sep 11, 2017 (not the first Monday)     WATCH THE VIDEO:   part 1     part 2    
Mindfulness, Compassion and Community
Zev Schuman-Olivier, MD
location: CMC see address above

As mindfulness becomes mainstream, many people seek out meditation to help solve personal problems, to enhance cognitive performance, or to optimize themselves through self-improvement, making it essential to remember that wise practice is dedicated not just to ourselves but for the well-being of all. Modern innovations in group learning through mindfulness-based programs can accelerate participants' recognition of common humanity, by illuminating patterns of mental conditioning that are widespread cause of human suffering. In this increasingly networked world with remote wired relationships, our hearts still yearn for the deep warmth of present moment connection and the healing that can come from compassionate contact from ourselves and those close to us. Dr. Schuman-Olivier will share data about the emergence of mindfulness centers and the potential they have for catalyzing community this kind of warm connection through mindfulness and compassion. He will describe a model for integrating mindfulness and compassion into a healthcare system as a means of cultivating diverse, inclusive, and warm community.

At the end of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. describe the benefits of integrating mindfulness and compassion within their practice and teaching.
  2. describe the emergence of mindfulness centers and how they can catalyze community connection.
  3. demonstrate innovative, conceptual and experiential methods for being warm and fully present with their experience of the world.

Zev Schuman-Olivier, MD is the Executive Director and Research Director of the CHA Center for Mindfulness and Compassion, Medical Director for Addiction Services at CHA, Instructor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, Faculty Member and Investigator at the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health at Dartmouth, and an addictions psychiatrist at CHA. As a board-certified addiction psychiatrist, he has been involved with research and clinical care of patients with addiction and mental illness. Prior to his psychiatric residency, he helped coordinate and implement the first federally-funded, randomized controlled trial of a mindfulness-oriented intervention for addictive disorders. Dr. Schuman-Olivier has presented locally, regionally and nationally on mindfulness for addictions treatment, and has trained residents and peers on the topic. He is currently the principal investigator for the MINDFUL-PC project, which aims to integrate mindfulness into the patient-centered medical home.

 

Oct 2, 2017
Psychotherapists and Our Self-evolutionary Path to Sustainable Well-being     WATCH THE VIDEO:    part 1    part 2
Matthew Hersh, PhD
location: Harvard  see address above

What do you do when you are diagnosed with a rare disease that bluntly threatens your life? This was the harsh reality for clinical psychologist, Matt Hersh nearly a decade ago, and it called into question every aspect of how he thought he was supposed to live and work. But hard-fought lessons are often soon forgotten, and the self-care that was thrust upon him during his illness and recovery became a new mindful path to living.

This talk is about how we, as mental health practitioners, are a unique group of workers who sit with profound suffering, the same suffering that one psychologist endured. But how do we actually take care of ourselves along the way? How do we purposefully tend to ourselves in the same meaningful and optimistic ways we approach our clients? Matt proposes that we must begin by valuing ourselves as non-negotiable priorities and evolve toward integrated and embodied self-caring beings. It is along this self-evolutionary path that we can learn how to be truly self-compassionate, and self-forgiving helpers for deep sustainability of vitality and well-being.

At the end of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. identify 3 values regarding your professional self-care and prevention of occupational hazards.
  2. describe at least 2 mindset shifts that can help facilitate integration of self-care into your professional and personal life.
  3. identify 3 self-care practices that could be seamlessly integrated into your workday.

Matt is a clinical psychologist with a private practice in Arlington and specializes in anxiety disorder treatment using an integrative approach of mindfulness, CBT, and Energy Psychology. Matt also serves as a consultant teacher to Harvard University's Koru Mindfulness program for emerging adults. Wanting to serve his fellow hard-working therapists, Matt founded The Thriving Therapist, an online home for mental health practitioners to cultivate awareness and skill for self-care, wellness, and burnout prevention. Finally, Matt recently co-founded VitalMind, a personal growth and wellness company specializing in mindful parenting, personal mindfulness training, and vitality-boosting life skills.

 

November 6, 2017
Equanimity: An Essential Practice for Turbulent Times     REGISTER HERE
Susan M Pollak MTS, Ed.D.
Location: CMC see address above

Equanimity is a skill that is taught in meditation centers and is a key component in Eastern psychology and philosophy. However, it is virtually absent from the literature in western psychology. As mindfulness and compassion enter the mainstream, this is changing. Equanimity allows us to keep our balance and sanity in difficult times and enables us to be with whatever is happening. This talk will feature experiential practice as well as theory and recent research. Ways to integrate it in clinical work will also be addressed.

At the end of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. explain the key components of equanimity
  2. discuss why it has been a key practice in Eastern philosophy
  3. understand how to bring it into our lives and practice

Susan M Pollak is the president of IMP. She is also a co-founder of the Center for Mindfulness and Compassion, Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School, where she has taught for over 20 years. She is the author of numerous books, most recently Sitting Together: Essential Skills for Mindfulness-Based Psychotherapy, with Thomas Pedulla and Ronald Siegel. She teaches nationally and internationally on the integration of mindfulness and compassion in psychotherapy. Dr. Pollak has a private practice in Cambridge.

Register here for Equanimity: An Essential Practice for Turbulent Times

 

December 4, 2017
Compassion Meditation: How It Changes The Brain and Improves Stress Resilience
Gaelle Desbordes, PhD
location: Harvard see address above

 

January 8, 2018
To Be Announced
Meghan Searl, PhD
location: CMC see address above

 

February 5, 2018
The Power of Mindfulness in a School Setting
Doug Worthen, co-presenter Chris Willard, PsyD
location: Harvard see address above

8 years ago the Middlesex School began integrating mindfulness into their school community by hiring a part-time mindfulness teacher. After a few years this position grew into a full-time position that is dedicated to sharing mindfulness with students, teachers, parents, staff, and alumni. Learn how this model has impacted the Middlesex community and why other schools may want to hire similar positions.

At the end of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. learn the different ways mindfulness is coming into independent and public schools
  2. understand the basics of a School Mindfulness Program
  3. describe about the different ways mindfulness is taught to students, athletes, faculty, staff, and parents.

 

Doug Worthen is the Director of Mindfulness Programs at the Middlesex School in Concord, Massachusetts. Since 2010 he has been supporting and educating the Middlesex School community (students, faculty, staff, parents, and alums) in mindfulness. Doug began practicing mindfulness meditation in 1999 as a member of the UVA national championship lacrosse team and has been a dedicated practitioner ever since. Living through two bouts of lymphoma, including a bone marrow transplant in 2007, Doug has experienced firsthand the healing power of mindfulness. Doug has attended several 1-3 month-long mindfulness retreats, is a faculty member of the iBme Teacher Training, and is dedicated to supporting other schools in creating full-time mindfulness faculty positions.

 

March 5, 2018
Kindness and the Atheist Case for Karma
Christopher Willard, PsyD
location: CMC see address above

There's an old joke that karma does not mean that cutting someone off in traffic means you won't find a good parking spot. But what if it does? In this talk, expanded from Chris's recent TEDx talk, we will explore more deeply the neuroscience, social science and even genetic science behind mindful and compassionate action. If “Karma” is a spiritual concept about of cause and effect, we will examine the ways that compassionate actions can "go viral" and ripple outwards through social contagion effects. We will also consider how compassion action can change us inwardly through neuroplasticity and influence future generations via epigenetics. Finally, we will discuss new social psychology research on "downstream and upstream reciprocity," which may have implications for how we perceive and feel about the world around us, and how our actions can ripple back to us, in what is essentially a statistical model of “what goes around comes around.” Looking more closely at how our behavior impacts ourselves, and the world, and how the world impacts us, we may well discover how you drive actually does affect whether you get that coveted parking spot.

At the end of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. understand the social psychology of behavioral contagion and upstream reciprocity
  2. learn about current research in the science of compassion and generosity
  3. understand how epigenetics may play a role in behavior and mental health

 

Dr. Christopher Willard (PsyD) is a psychologist and educational consultant. He has been practicing meditation for nearly 20 years, and leading workshops internationally on the topic of mindfulness, education, and psychotherapy. He currently serves on the board of directors at the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy, and is the president of the Mindfulness in Education Network. He is the author of Child’s Mind (2010), Growing Up Mindful (2016), Raising Resilience (2017), and various other books. He teaches at Harvard Medical School.

 

April 2, 2018
Trauma Sensitive Yoga
David Schouela, co-presenter Chris Willard, PsyD
location: Harvard see address above

Trauma Sensitive Yoga (TSY) is an adjunctive treatment for complex trauma that focuses on giving clients an opportunity to practice noticing body sensation (interoception) in the context of a safe relationship based on an invitational approach to yoga forms with no physical assists. TSY was recently listed in SAMHSA's National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices. This workshop will be delivered in a lecture format with some optional chair based yoga.

At the end of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. describe the theoretical underpinnings of Trauma Sensitive Yoga
  2. explain how TSY differs from other forms of yoga
  3. describe how TSY has been successfully applied in various treatment settings.

 

David Schouela, RYT-500, is a Kripalu Yoga teacher whose current primary focus is teaching yoga to teens and adults with PTSD. David is on the teaching faculty for the trauma sensitive yoga certificate program offered through the Trauma Center at JRI in Brookline, MA. He is also a co-founder and board member of True North Insight Meditation Center in Quebec, Canada. David provides training on yoga and meditation as scientifically supported healing modalities for stress-related conditions and as means of liberating body, mind and heart.

 

May 7, 2018
Making Mindfulness Accessible
Tara Marie Healey, MEd
location: CMC see address above

Mindfulness is everywhere these days. Because of this there is a risk of watering down and losing the essence, meaning and value of this ancient and profound practice. What exactly is mindfulness and where does meditation fit in? How does one introduce practices in corporate or other non-traditional settings? And finally, what are the best practices, what should be avoided when introducing mindfulness in different environments and what resources support ongoing development and practice?

At the end of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. describe and define mindfulness and meditation
  2. identify 3 values regarding your professional self-care and prevention of occupational hazards
  3. describe at least 2 mindset shifts that can help facilitate integration of self-care into your professional and personal life
  4. identify 3 self-care practices that could be seamlessly integrated into your workday.

 

In addition to holding an M.Ed. in Health Education and having over 20 years of experience in organizational development, Tara is a longtime practitioner of mindfulness and an advocate for the health benefits associated with practice. The comprehensive suite of mindfulness courses developed by Tara have been conducted at over 150 organizations, reaching over 10,000 individuals. Additionally Tara has spoken at numerous events domestic and abroad and has contributed to articles to Mindful Magazine and the Harvard Business Review blog.

 

June 4, 2018
Radical Authenticity: Loving Your Borderline and Challenging Clients
Barbara Van Zoeren, MSW, LICSW
location: Harvard see address above

In this presentation we will discuss ways in which we can work more effectively with our clients' challenging behaviors. We will discuss ways to incorporate our own mindful awareness in ways that enable a better understanding and response to our clients’ intentions and actions in the clinical relationship. We will examine key stylistic strategies and assumptions from Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) that make more effective and compassionate interventions. By applying specific strategies and effective framing of collaborative treatment goals, we can empower clients to see themselves with less judgment and understand their impact on others in the world, often a major cause of their suffering.

At the end of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. describe some basic attitudes and practices that might increase the probability of successful treatment
  2. identify some acceptance-based assumptions about clients that have been found helpful for both the therapist and the client
  3. explain the concept of "radical genuineness" and other validation strategies that help when treating emotionally vulnerable clients

 

Barbara Van Zoeren LICSW is a Clinical Social Worker in Private Practice in Arlington MA. Her particular areas of interest are in borderline personality disorder, developmental trauma and mindfulness. She is a trained and experienced Dialectical Behavior Therapy clinician and supervises and consults to clinicians and families regarding clients and/or loved ones with BPD. Barbara completed the IMP's Mindfulness and Psychotherapy Certificate program in 2009 and has practiced Vipassana meditation and incorporated mindfulness into her work since then. She also currently teaches a mindfulness course at Simmons Graduate School of Social Work, and enjoys sharing the benefits of mindfulness practice both explicitly and implicitly, with all her clients and students.

 

Continuing Education

Psychologists: The Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This course offers 2 hours of credit per session.
 

Licensed Mental Health Counselors: The Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6048. Programs that do not quality for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy is solely responsible for all aspects of the program. This program is approved for 2 clock hours. It is also applicable for MaMHCA/MMCEP hours for re-licensure, in accordance with 161 CMR.

Marriage & Family Therapists: Application for marriage and family therapist continuing education credits has been submitted to the Massachusetts Association for Marriage & Family Therapy, Inc. Please contact the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy at mail@meditationandpsychotherapy.org for the status of marriage and family therapist accreditation. Certification # provided at each lecture.

Social Workers: Application for social work continuing education credits has been submitted. Please contact the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy at mail@meditationandpsychotherapy.org for the status of social work accreditation. Certification # provided at each lecture. 

Nurses: This program carries 2 contact hours and meets the specifications of the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Nursing (244 CMR 5.00). 

 


Past Season: 2016-17

September 12, 2016
The Five Hindrances in Daily Life and How Clients and Clinicians Can Overcome Them
Presenter: Mitch Abblett, PhD

Boxing great Muhammad Ali once remarked that “Often it isn’t the mountains ahead that wear you out, it’s the little pebble in your shoe.”  

Clients and clinicians might ask: What is wrong with us if we’ve been meditating for years and we’re still generally making ourselves crazy with doubt and insecurity?  How can we make our lives more effective, worthwhile and meaningful ? How do I minimize pain and suffering? How do I get what I really want?  And will I really even want it once I get it? 

Behind our office doors we see clients who enact these questions through the symptoms and behaviors that  brought them to our door-– the various forms of taking, leaving, shoving and hiding aspects of their inner lives. Beneath all of these questions lies one... In this moment, will I open or will I close?

Join us in person (The Arlington Center, Arlington, MA) or online (via Zoom, https://zoom.us/j/6569147405) as Dr. Abblett explores the Buddhist conception of the “five hindrances” (desire, hostility, sluggishness, worry and doubt).  He will investigate the five hindrances in meditation and consider them in the process of engaging clients, to move toward authentic experience rather than merely repeating karmic conditioning.  

The workshop draws on Dr. Abblett’s professional experience as a psychologist working in a variety of acute settings and client populations, the sciences of the brain, mindfulness, and positive psychology.  His presentation underscores how clinicians can help clients identify and skillfully understand the nature, application and daily life relevance of the moment-to-moment choice to open or close when the universal hindrances to clarity and compassion arise.

At the completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  1. Assess and identify the role of the five hindrances in clients’ presentations, and in psychotherapy process and treatment outcome. 
  2. Demonstrate skill in managing one’s own patterns of hindrance that may block clients’ treatment progress. 
  3. Incorporate specific practices to manage hindrance patterns into daily routines as a practicing clinician, and build client’s skills in doing so for themselves.

Dr. Mitch Abblett is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Wellesley Hills and the Executive Director of the Institute for Meditation & Psychotherapy.  For over a decade he was the Clinical Director of the Manville School, a Harvard-affiliated therapeutic day school program in Boston, serving children and adolescents with emotional, behavioral and learning difficulties.  In  addition to his private therapy and consulting practice (Incite Consulting), he has written regarding  mindfulness, professional development and family mental health, including The Heat of the Moment in Treatment: Mindful Management of Difficult Clients (W.W. Norton) for clinicians and, co-authored with Chris Willard, Mindfulness for Teen Depression (New Harbinger), and the card deck practice aids, Growing Mindful and Growing Happy (PESI Publications).  A book on the Buddhist Five Hindrances and their management in daily life is planned for a 2018 release (Shambhala).  He blogs regularly on Mindful.org.  He conducts national and international trainings regarding mindfulness and its applications.

 

October 10, 2016
Cultivating the Inner Holding Environment in Meditation     
Presenter: Bill Morgan, PsyD

Alternate Title: Why We Don’t Practice Meditation Regularly: Addressing the Elephant in the Meditation Room
 
Do you feel that your meditation practice could be more alive, more dynamic? Are you having trouble beginning? Do you feel a sense of frustration or ineffectiveness when you sit, or you’re not sure how to integrate it into your daily life? Maybe you’re beating yourself up for the method or frequency of your practice? Maybe you once believed in a “hero’s journey” of practice but now feel disenchanted? 
Welcome to the club; you are part of the silent majority of practitioners. This workshop will address common but seldom examined obstacles to practice, and offer serving suggestions for enlivening meditation.  
 
At the completion of this activity, participants should be able to:
  1. Participants will understand the major obstacles to establishing a regular meditation practice.
  2. Participants will understand the importance of cultivating an inner holding environment for meditation.
  3. Participants will learn visualization practices to enrich their meditation.
Bill is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Cambridge and Quincy MA. He is a founding board member of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy, and has participated in 8 years of intensive retreats in the Theravada, Zen, and Tibetan schools of Buddhism during his forty years of meditation practice. He has led mindfulness retreats for mental health professionals for the past 20 years. Bill is a contributing author to Mindfulness and Psychotherapy, Second Edition. His book, The Meditator’s Dilemma: An Innovative Approach to Overcoming Obstacles and Revitalizing Your Practice, was recently published by Shambhala.

 Email: wdmorgan33@gmail.com • Website: www.BillandSusan.org

 

November 7, 2016
Explicit Emotional-Mindfulness in Psychotherapy: A Workshop Overview of Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP)  
Presenter: Judy Silvan, LICSW

 
The AEDP model created by Diana Fosha (Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy), brings an unmistakeable non-dual mindfulness to each psychotherapy session. Through a slowed down, moment-to-moment gentle experience of dyadic-attunement, the therapy becomes an accelerated road to lasting emotional healing & brain change. The dynamic becomes a relational duet that undoes the patient's “unbearable aloneness”, often caused by attachment disruptions, shame, and trauma. Through an experiential and "being," rather than interpretive and "doing" approach, AEDP quickly fosters trust, a softening of defenses and leads to healing spirals. The presentation will cover a basic framework of AEDP and the resultant clinical phenomenology for the patient and the dyad. Video demonstrations of consenting cases will be included as a demonstration of the protocol. The patient understands that moment-to-moment tracking and dyadic attuning helps them to feel deeply understood, and is a path to transformation. The model often becomes a shared and transformative contemplative experience for both therapist and patient.  
 
At the completion of this activity, participants should be able to:
  • Highlight and define major AEDP healing components
  • Understand and discuss video tape of actual AEDP sessions 
  • Practice beginning AEDP clinical skills through a brief experiential exercise 
  • Discuss, meta-process and integrate the evening’s learning material through an experiential approach

Judy Silvan, LICSW (LCSW CA #61755) works as a licensed psychotherapist in Cambridge, MA and in the Bay area of CA during portions of the year. She practices movement and mindfulness-inclusive AEDP. She was certified by IMP (2011), by the International Society of Bioenergetics (2004), and most recently by the AEDP institute (2014) where she is currently a candidate for AEDP Supervisor. She finished her Masters Level Training at Smith College School for Social work in 1985. The hallmark of her work is helping people evolve from attachment or other forms of emotional trauma, towards an enlightened, non-dual experience of truth and healing in their lives. 

 

December 5, 2016
Mindfulness, Chronic Pain and Quality Outcome Measures    
Presenter: William Jackson, PsyD

In this presentation, Dr. Jackson will share his experience with meditation as a Buddhist monk and lay practitioner, exploring current research models that help clinicians make informed decisions about best interventions. Meditation is an intensely personal and subjective experience where gains are hard to objectively quantify. Bridging the gap between a compassionate experiential practice and a symptom-reduction focused model of medicine and psychotherapy is a challenge without the loss of "meaning." Having clear practice method, quality outcomes and respect for ancient practices and cultures where meditation was created, as well as contemporary research and crafted interventions is essential. 

Participants will:
1. Participants will understand cultural influences on contemporary mindfulness interventions.
2. Participants will learn current research results of mindfulness interventions in the chronic pain population.
3. Participants will learn the steps involved in a systematic review and importance of systematic reviews in clinical decision-making.

William Jackson spent 6 years as a Buddhist monk, has been practicing meditation for 15 years and has been teaching meditation for nearly a decade, including a current class at South Boston Yoga. William completed his doctoral degree in clinical health psychology from William James College. He has worked at Massachusetts General Hospital and Tufts Cranial Facial Pain Center, and a number of other settings. He is currently collaborating on research projects with the Benson Henry Institute for Mind-body Medicine and recently finished a systematic review on quality outcome measures for chronic pain research.  He specializes in opioid risk stratification, multidisciplinary pain treatment and mindfulness based therapies. 

 

January 9, 2017
Self-Compassion in Psychotherapy: Advanced Clinical Techniques     
Presenter: Tim Desmond, LMFT
 

We know that self-compassion has the power to help us let go of anxiety, anger and suffering from the past, as well as to develop greater peace of mind, strength of presence, and a more open heart. But we also know that these benefits come from practice, not just accumulating knowledge. In this presentation, we will explore advanced clinical techniques for utilizing the power of self-compassion with nearly any client. We will explore Dialogue-Based Mindfulness to improve our ability to teach mindfulness and compassion practices to clients in acute emotional distress. We will also learn custom-tailored compassion training practices to improve emotional regulation, reduce self-criticism, and heal trauma. 

Participants will:

  1. Understand the role of the brain's "Care Circuit" in compassion training. 
  2. Describe Dialogue-Based Mindfulness and how it differs from traditional guided meditations.
  3. Apply self-compassion to the concept of modularity and "psychological parts."


Tim Desmond, LMFT, is a mindfulness teacher, therapist, and co-founder of Morning Sun Mindfulness Center in Alstead, NH. He is the author of Self-Compassion in Psychotherapy and offers training to therapists around the world, helping them to integrate mindfulness and self-compassion practices into their work. He is a student of Thich Nhat Hanh, with whom he has studied closely for nearly 20 years. Tim offers a 12-week online course called the Foundations of Self-Compassion.

 

February 6, 2017
Rational Mind, Animal Body: The Psychology of Conflict in Kripalu Yoga  
Presenter: Doug Baker, LICSW

Hugely trendy as a workout, Yoga is less well-known as a contemplative tradition rooted in the quest for freedom from psychological suffering. This presentation will briefly explore the history of yoga as a contemplative tradition, putting today's posture-based practice in perspective. This experiential and didactic presentation then dives into Kripalu yoga as psychology from the perspective of inner conflict, and as compliment to Buddhist psychology. Participants will explore experiential learning with simple, non-athletic yogic breath and body practices. As time allows, we will touch on how yoga interventions can be applied in psychotherapy.

At the completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

1. To learn the historical context of Yoga as contemplative tradition

2. To learn the foundations of Yogic Psychology

3. To learn experiential practices for somatic applications of Yogic Psychology


Douglas Baker, LICSW, is a former clinician of the Psychiatric Emergency Service at Cambridge Hospital, and founder of Cambridge Mind Body, a holistic counseling practice in Cambridge. A Kripalu Yoga teacher, he and leads workshops on the self-liberation potential of yoga and meditation and its application in psychotherapy. He is currently writing a small, portable book on walking meditation.

 

March 6, 2017
Creating the Inner Holding Environment: An Experimental Workshop   
Presenters: Susan Morgan, MSN, RN, CS and Bill Morgan, PsyD

Why do so many of us struggle to establish a regular meditation practice? Could it be that traditional instructions are not engaging enough for our high stimulus cultural milieu? In order to support a more enlivening atmosphere for meditation, there are several important building blocks which need to be established at the beginning of practice. If these are overlooked meditation is more likely to be colored by restlessness, boredom and cognitive drift. These foundational elements—a settled posture, an easy breath and affectively engaged attention- create a holding environment for practice. This workshop will focus on identifying and engaging core elements of this internal holding environment, with serving suggestions about how to cultivate them.

At the completion of this activity, participants should be able to:
 

1.       Cognitively and experientially learn the three core elements of the inner holding environment for practicing mindfulness meditation.
 
2.       Cognitively and experientially learn how to elicit these three elements during a practice session.

3.       Cognitively and experientially learn how to monitor and adjust these core elements during meditation practice. 

Bill Morgan, PsyD is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Cambridge and Quincy MA. He is a founding board member of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy, and has participated in 8 years of intensive retreats in the Theravada, Zen, and Tibetan schools of Buddhism during his forty years of meditation practice. He has led mindfulness retreats for mental health professionals for the past 20 years. Bill is a contributing author to Mindfulness and Psychotherapy, Second Edition. His book, The Meditator’s Dilemma: An Innovative Approach to Overcoming Obstacles and Revitalizing Your Practice, was recently published by Shambhala.   Email: wdmorgan33@gmail.com • Website: www.BillandSusan.org

 

Susan T. Morgan, MSN, RN, CS is a psychotherapist who teaches mindfulness meditation to individuals and groups, and consults with psychotherapists interested in deepening their meditation practice and therapeutic presence. Susan has practiced Buddhist meditation for 25 years, primarily in the Theravada tradition, and recently completed a 4-year retreat with her partner Bill. She has co-led mindfulness retreats and workshops for psychotherapists with Bill for the past 15 years. Lovingkindness and mindfulness of the body are integral to her teaching. Susan is a contributing author to Mindfulness and Psychotherapy, Second Edition. Email: stmorgan11@gmail.com • Website: www.BillandSusan.org

 

 

April 3, 2017
Teaching Meditation to Adolescents - Approaches and Therapeutic Benefits 
Presenter: Jessica Morey, MA

In her work sharing meditation with teens, Jessica and others have integrated mindfulness and compassion meditation, relational mindfulness practices, mindful movement, creative expression, and nature awareness practices. These modalities will be presented and demonstrated. Jessica will emphasize the core qualities of a "mindful mentor" - authentic relationship building, attuned compassion and respect - which are the critical foundations for teaching mindfulness to youth. She will also present an overview of the research on the benefits of meditation and mindfulness for youth and present research on teen retreats. This presentation will include lecture, guided practices and relational mindfulness activities. 

Participants will learn:

  1. Approaches and activities to engage youth in mindfulness meditation practice
  2. Core qualities of Mindful Mentoring with youth
  3. Overview of research findings on the benefits of mindfulness meditation for youth

Jessica Morey, MA is the Executive Director of Inward Bound Mindfulness Education (iBme), an international non-profit that leads secular meditation retreats for teenagers and young adults. She began practicing meditation at age 14 on teen retreats offered by the Insight Meditation Society (IMS). She has attended longer retreats (1-3 months) in Asia and the U.S, participated for 10 years in the IMS young adult mentoring group and trained as a Buddhist meditation teacher with Noah Levine and Against the Stream. Jessica is a founding board member and lead teacher for iBme teen retreats.  Before joining iBme, Jessica worked in clean energy and climate policy and finance. She holds a BA in Environmental Engineering from Dartmouth and Masters degrees in Sustainable Development and International Affairs. Her article in Mindful Magazine, “Finding My Way,” describes her experience learning and benefiting from mindfulness throughout her young adult years.

 

May 1, 2017
The Buddhas Wife: The power of relational mindfulness in clinical practice     
Presenter: Janet Surrey, PhD
 

Insight Dialogue is a co-meditative practice specifically bringing mindfulness into relationship, including speaking  and listening. Clinical applications for the therapy relationship will be discussed and demonstrated.

Participants will learn:

1. Practice  the guidelines for Relational  mindfulness
2.  Apply the practice to clinical relational practice-especially deep listening and wise speech
3. Learn how mindfulness practiced in relationship can help clients with relational difficulties 

 

Janet Surrey, PhD is a clinical psychologist in private practice in Newton.  She is a Founding scholar of the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute at the Stone Center, Wellesley College and a Board member of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy. She is trained as an Insight Dialogue teacher in the Buddhist Theravadan tradition and co-author of The Buddha'sWife:the Path of Awakening Together.

 
 
 
June 5, 2017
Implicit mindfulness:  Bringing Mindfulness Concepts to Pre-Contemplative Patients     
Presenter: Laura Warren, MD

This presentation will discuss techniques for bringing mindfulness concepts implicitly to encounters with patients who, for a variety of reasons (cultural, religious, etc), have a more difficult time engaging with mindfulness when it is explicitly discussed, for which the term “pre-contemplative” is applied. We will discuss ways to incorporate language and concepts clinically that implicitly reflect core mindfulness principles while also respecting patients’ unique identity and values. We will also discuss using implicit mindfulness to frame shared goals with patients with regard to their overall physical and mental health. 

Participants will learn to:

  1. ·      Identify “pre-contemplative” patients who might benefit from implicit mindfulness
  2. ·      Integrate specific language/concepts that reflect implicit mindfulness concepts
  3. ·      Apply implicit mindfulness to clinical settings when appropriate

Bio: Laura Warren, M.D. is an outpatient psychiatrist at Cambridge Health Alliance (CHA), and works in primary care as well as specialty mental health.  She was first trained in MBSR in 2007, and completed the IMP Meditation and Psychotherapy Certificate Program in 2009, and since then has been incorporating mindfulness into her clinical practice.  She has been involved with the Center For Mindfulness and Compassion at CHA since its inception.  Currently she is teaching as part of the MINDFUL-PC program, which seeks to bringing mindfulness groups to primary care, and she has been involved in bringing mindfulness to psychiatry residency training. She recently joined the board of IMP, and is interested in using mindfulness to help patients and providers manage stress, and to reduce burnout among healthcare professionals.